5 min read

Rare Photos Let You Experience Africa's Wildlife Right At Home

Want to enjoy the beauty of African wildlife in its natural habitat without having to book a flight? Look no further.

Will Burrard-Lucas/WWF-US

Will Burrard-Lucas/WWF-US

Photographer Will Burrard-Lucas got up close and personal with some of the world's most elusive animals over the course of three months last year at Namibia's Kavango Zambezi Transfrontier Conservation Area.

Will Burrard-Lucas/WWF-US

Will Burrard-Lucas/WWF-US

Some of the animals had only previously been captured by research cameras before, Burrard-Lucas wrote in a blog post about the project, completed on assignment for the World Wildlife Fund (WWF).

Will Burrard-Lucas/WWF-US

Will Burrard-Lucas/WWF-US

"My personal motivation for working on this project was that is was for a really worthwhile cause," Burrard-Lucas told The Dodo.

Will Burrard-Lucas/WWF-US

Will Burrard-Lucas/WWF-US

"To photograph animals who have probably never been photographed before and for these images to be used by WWF to help with their conservation efforts."

Will Burrard-Lucas/WWF-US

Will Burrard-Lucas/WWF-US

Burrard-Lucas said he had previously spent two weeks in Namibia trying to find and photograph carnivores like lions, hyenas, leopards and African wild dogs, but to no avail. However, he was able to overcome this challenge by utilizing five Camtraptions camera trap systems, which, unlike research cameras, incorporate a high-quality DSLR camera.

Will Burrard-Lucas/WWF-US

Will Burrard-Lucas/WWF-US

The final result? High-definition, rare glimpses into the Zambezi region's wildlife scene at its most natural and undisturbed.

The photos also provide a rather intimate look of a (sometimes) peaceful coexistence between species.

Will Burrard-Lucas/WWF-US

Will Burrard-Lucas/WWF-US

"One of the things that made this project so unique for me was that these animals were so shy that I did not actually seeing any of them with my own eyes," he said.

Will Burrard-Lucas/WWF-US

Will Burrard-Lucas/WWF-US

"I never knew what my camera traps had captured until I checked the memory cards."

Will Burrard-Lucas/WWF-US

Will Burrard-Lucas/WWF-US

In his blog post, Burrard-Lucas said the animals who proved to be the greatest challenge to capture were the lions.

Will Burrard-Lucas/WWF-US

Will Burrard-Lucas/WWF-US

"I set up two camera traps near waterholes that the lions sometimes visit," he explained. "In the three months my traps were operating, the lions passed by twice, resulting in some very rare shots of these secretive big cats."

Will Burrard-Lucas/WWF-US

Will Burrard-Lucas/WWF-US

"The abundance of animals was startling, particularly as I had hardly seen any of them and that they were outside national parks, in and around areas where people live," Burrard-Lucas said.

Will Burrard-Lucas/WWF-US

Will Burrard-Lucas/WWF-US

"I hope that now these images can be used to show people how much wildlife is living in these unprotected areas and hopefully inspire people to protect them, before it is too late."

Will Burrard-Lucas/WWF-US

Will Burrard-Lucas/WWF-US

Watch the magic behind Burrard-Lucas' smart camera work below:

Get started here to see how you can help WWF protect wildlife in their natural habitats.

Inspired to take a trip to Namibia? We don't blame you. Start planning by checking out ecotourism attractions in Zambezi and beyond.