3 min read

What Do Mike Tyson And Quantum Physics Have In Common?

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They bothlove pigeons.

The world of physics is just now catching up to the beauty of the bird that launched Tyson's boxing career (his first fight as a Brownsville middle-schooler was in defense of a pigeon.) A new animal-related paradox involving "quantum pigeons" has emerged to parallel the most famous physics paradox, Schrödinger's cat. According to Physic's World:

Jeff Tollaksen of Chapman University in California and colleagues in Israel, Italy and the UK have proposed an equally bizarre scenario dubbed the "quantum-pigeonhole effect". The paradox begins with the observation that when you put three pigeons in two pigeonholes, there will always be at least two pigeons in the same hole. But according to the team's quantum analysis, it is possible for none of the pigeons to share a hole. "It's one of those things that seem to be impossible," says Tollaksen. But it is a direct consequence of quantum mechanics and, he adds, "It really has immense implications."

Jeff Tollaksen of Chapman University in California and colleagues in Israel, Italy and the UK have proposed an equally bizarre scenario dubbed the "quantum-pigeonhole effect". The paradox begins with the observation that when you put three pigeons in two pigeonholes, there will always be at least two pigeons in the same hole. But according to the team's quantum analysis, it is possible for none of the pigeons to share a hole.

"It's one of those things that seem to be impossible," says Tollaksen. But it is a direct consequence of quantum mechanics and, he adds, "It really has immense implications."

Pigeons! Good for boxing, good for physics and a more reliable mail provider than Yahoo!

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