When wildlife law enforcement officers in Cameroon confiscated loot from traffickers in 2014, they found six chimp heads, 30 chimp hands and feet and one very terrified baby chimp.

Confiscated chimp save from traffickers in CameroonLAGA

Daphne was only 4 months old when she was brought to Ape Action Africa's sanctuary for traumatized apes like her. Because she would have still been with her mother at such a young age, she needed 24-hour care. And given what she had been through, she was visibly scared of the world around her.

Baby chimp rescued from traffickersApe Action Africa

Baby chimp rescued from traffickersApe Action Africa

Now, just over two years later, Daphne has completely blossomed into a happy, healthy little chimp, eager to meet new friends. And that's just what she's been doing recently at her sanctuary home.

While Daphne has been acting as a big sister to other, younger chimps rescued by the sanctuary, she recently became big enough to play with the older kids.

Chimp rescued years ago from traffickers in CameroonIan Bickerstaff/Ape Action Africa

"Daphne has been an amazing big sister to Little Larry, Paula and Jenny this past year, but some changes are underway," the sanctuary wrote in February. "For a while now Daphne has been exploring the boundaries of her forest play area and straying further away from her little group. Older and more mature than her friends, Daphne needed new challenges, so we have begun her introduction to Mac's group of 10 young chimps."

First, Daphne met David and Ayisha β€” everyone was pretty excited.

Rescued chimps playing in CameroonMathilde Malapert/Ape Action Africa

"They have been playing for several hours a day," Ape Action Africa wrote. "There have been lots of games, tickles and laughter so far."

Rescued chimps playing in CameroonMathilde Malapert/Ape Action Africa

Rescued chimps hugging in CameroonMathilde Malapert/Ape Action Africa

Then, earlier this month, Daphne met "the handsome leader" of her new group: Mac.

"Daphne took the next step in her introduction to our young chimp group recently, meeting Mac for a one-one play date," Ape Action Africa wrote. "Mac ... loves to play more than anything in the world, but he also loves his downtime."

Rescued chimp at Cameroon sanctuaryMathilde Malapert/Ape Action Africa

Apparently, after playing for two hours, laughing and wrestling, Mac was ready for some alone time. "Mac tried to make a nest for his midday nap, but Daphne just wanted to keep playing," Ape Action Africa wrote.

Rescued chimps playing in CameroonMathilde Malapert/Ape Action Africa

Rescued chimps playing in CameroonMathilde Malapert/Ape Action Africa

Mac even gave Daphne a piggy back ride.

Rescued chimps playing in CameroonMathilde Malapert/Ape Action Africa

"Whilst poor Mac had to give up all hope of rest, it's encouraging to see that Daphne has so much confidence and energy. It will serve her well when she eventually joins all 10 chimps in their enclosure," the sanctuary wrote.

Rescued chimps snuggling in CameroonMathilde Malapert/Ape Action Africa

Even though she's getting to be a big kid, Daphne is still returning to sleep at night with her younger adoptive siblings, Little Larry, Paula and Jenny, who are very happy when their big sister returns.

Chimpanzees are endangered because of poaching and habitat loss, so it's all the more special to see rescued chimps get a chance at the lives they really deserve. To help Ape Action Africa take care of Daphne and all her new friends, you can make a donation.