This week, the internet lost its collective mind over Tun, a sweet raccoon dog rescued as an abandoned pup by a Japanese Twitter user.

One photo of Tun curling up to a space heater, for instance, racked up over 10,000 retweets by Tuesday afternoon.

As the name suggests, raccoon dogs like Tun certainly resemble America's native trash bandits. However, the species is much more closely related to domestic dogs, a fact that pictures of the playful canine seem to bear out.

In November, that seemingly subtle difference turned into a major controversy for Canadian clothing maker Kit and Ace, who maintained that hats made out of the animals were "raccoon fur (not dog)."

Even more alarmingly, major retailers like Macy's and Kohl's have been caught selling products made out of raccoon dogs as "faux fur" in the past.

While clothing companies can claim that they're raccoons and not dogs, it's hard to argue that the millions of animals like Tun killed for their fur each year are "fake."

In the United States and many other Western countries, such deceptions are a violation of the law, but in Canada no such labeling requirements exist. Vancouver politician Don Davies hopes to change that, sponsoring a petition this month to regulate fur sales in Canada.

If you live in Canada, click here to sign Davies' petition. Or, to learn more about the fur industry, visit the Humane Society of the United States' website here.

If they knew about anything other than napping and getting fed, the Tuns of the world would surely appreciate it.