3 min read

Unicorns Do (Sort Of) Exist ... In The Ocean

They're known as the unicorns of the sea, but mythical narwhals are very real indeed.

Mystery surrounds the dolphin's strange cousin, who can live for half a century and weigh nearly two tons. And this is probably one of the reasons we love them.

Their unicorn-like horn is actually a lengthy super-sensory long tooth.

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Present only in males of the species, the tooth can grow to be ten feet long, and scientists are largely baffled by the tooth's mysterious presence.

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The narwhal doesn't appear to use it as a spear to catch fish, nor does the animal seem use it to poke around the dark ocean floor, which narwhals navigate perfectly well through sonar.

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The tusk doesn't seem to be used necessarily as a weapon either. Though males have been seen clashing tusks, it's unclear whether it's a show of aggression or merely a friendly tete-a-tete.

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But their magical tusks have proven deadly - to them. For hundreds of years, the most curious animals on earth (human beings) have hunted the unicorn-like animal so that they can take their magical tusks.

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Even in recent years, people have illegally slain the elusive narwhal so they could sell their magical tusk for money. But by far the greatest real-world threat to the narwhal is climate change and pollution, making frigid waters warmer and food harder to find.

YouTube/NatGeoWild