3 min read

JFK Airport Security Finds Strangest Thing In Passenger's Luggage

They were stuffed inside HAIR CURLERS 😱

When Francis Gurahoo arrived at New York’s JFK International Airport on a flight from Guyana, the agents at customs immediately noticed that something was off with his carry-on luggage. They pulled him aside so they could examine his belongings more closely, and were shocked and dismayed by what they found inside. 

Somehow, Gurahoo had managed to smuggle 34 finches inside his carry-on bags — and each one was stuffed inside a plastic hair curler. 

bird in hair curlers
U.S. Attorney's Office

The poor birds were stuck inside the uncomfortable hair curlers for the entire six-hour flight, plus all of the additional travel time throughout each airport. They were no doubt confused and terrified, and it was hard to believe someone could treat so many animals with such cruelty. 

Gurahoo had smuggled the birds all the way from Guyana so that he could attempt to sell them to be used in singing competitions throughout Brooklyn and Queens, according to the U.S. Attorney’s office. During the competitions, two finches are pitted against each other, and a judge determines which one is the better singer. People bet on the birds throughout the competition, and a winning finch is highly sought after. 

birds in hair curlers
U.S. Attorney's Office

While there are finches in the U.S., many people believe the ones from Guyana sing better. Gurahoo was planning on selling each finch for around $3,000 — and was hoping to make around $100,000 on the innocent birds. 

Gurahoo immediately admitted his crimes as soon as the birds were discovered, and was taken into custody. 

birds in hair curlers
U.S. Attorney's Office

Unfortunately, smuggling animals across the world to be sold for various reasons is not uncommon, and happens far too often. Fortunately, these particular birds were found before they could be sold into a life of competition, and their ordeal will hopefully help to spread awareness and stop animal smugglers in the future.