Woman Hears Someone Crying From A Tree — Then Notices A Tiny Black Blob

"[A] tiny little girl with big lungs, telling everyone who was nearby that she was there!”

A woman was strolling along a creek in Australia when she suddenly heard tiny cries coming from above. She looked up, confused, searching for the source of the sound. Finally, she spotted a small black blob clinging to a branch, waiting for someone to help her.

baby bat
Townsville Bat Rescue

The woman realized the cries were coming from a baby bat who’d been separated from her family. Wanting to help, she quickly contacted Townsville Bat Rescue.

“Flying foxes are colony animals, so any bat alone in a tree usually means it is injured, sick or an abandoned baby,” CJ Murphy, president of Townsville Bat Rescue, told The Dodo. “Peggy was a tiny little girl with big lungs, telling everyone who was nearby that she was there!”

baby bat
Townsville Bat Rescue

Murphy used an extendable pole with a soft cloth attached to the end to reach up into the trees and pull Peggy down to safety.

“Babies especially want to be saved and will cling onto anything furry/soft when it is near,” Murphy said. “They just can't let go of branches and drop to you. Peggy, who was only a tiny 64 grams, jumped straight on the cloth. She cuddled straight up and settled — happy to be safe!”

baby bat
Townsville Bat Rescue

Peggy was a little dehydrated but, otherwise, appeared to be in pretty good shape. Murphy took her home and got her all settled in, making sure to give her lots of fluids. Today, she’s already gained a bunch of weight and is feeling so much better. She’s getting stronger every day, and Murphy can’t wait to see how much she’ll grow over the next several months.

baby bat
Townsville Bat Rescue

“This season’s orphans will not go into the release cage together until around February, then hopefully [will] be released by March or April,” Murphy said.

Bats are an important part of the environment, and little Peggy will play a big role once she's strong enough to be back in the wild where she belongs.

If you’d like to help support Peggy, you can donate to Townsville Bat Rescue.