8 min read

5 Tips To Permanently Rid Your House Of Pet Pee

Everybody pees. Humans pee in toilets (or diapers), dogs pee on grass and cats pee in litter boxes.

But sometimes, for reasons known only to them, cats choose to bypass the litter box and pee wherever they damn well feel like peeing. Because they're cats - and cats do what they want.

And dogs? Well, they're often just as guilty.

But fear not: Where there's pee, there's a solution - literally and figuratively.

First things first. Get some towels (and maybe a gas mask, because pee is no joke) and blot up as much urine as you can. Don't rub: It'll push urine deeper into the carpet, and that will only make life harder.

"If it's a large spot and you don't want to waste paper towels, use a cloth towel or old clothes that can be thrown away," Animal Planet suggests. "If the spot is on the carpet, stand on the wet spot (remember to wear shoes)."

Here are 5 methods that work when cleaning up a pee stain, whether it's wet or already set in.

1. White vinegar

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White vinegar neutralizes odors and works well for wet stains, and can help with those that have been there a while, too.

"Start by blotting the area," Vetstreet suggests. "Then mix equal parts white vinegar and cold water, and pour the mixture generously over the soiled section. Blot well, and then let it dry. (A fan can speed up the process.) Once dry, run a vacuum over the area."

2. Baking soda

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3. Club soda

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"When it comes to pre-treating a soiled carpet, club soda works great for nearly any type of pet stain. Since it's only effective while the soda is effervescing, the treatment may need to be applied several times," Vetstreet says.

Make sure to blot the area before pouring on club soda. "Once the solution has stopped fizzing, immediately blot the spot again, repeating as necessary. If the stain isn't fresh, you'll likely need to follow up with the above baking soda treatment."

4. A quick homemade concoction

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"Mix 3/4 cup of three percent hydrogen peroxide (you know you have some under your bathroom sink) with 1 teaspoon of dish detergent," Animal Planet suggests. "Sprinkle this solution over the baking soda and test a small spot. You need to do this because sometimes peroxide can discolor or bleach fabrics. Work the baking soda into the fabric or carpet."

5. Citrus-enzyme cleaner

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Stain removal products usually include enzymes to digest and break down stains and odors on a molecular level, and Everyday Roots recommends making your own at home to save money. But this takes THREE MONTHS to set, so it's something you'll want to have on hand for the future.

You'll need 7 tablespoons of brown sugar, 1½ cups of lemon and orange peels, 1 liter of water and a large clear container that can hold the liquid and peels.

"Funnel 7 tablespoons of brown sugar into your container, and add the fruit," the website suggests. "Next, add the water, and tightly screw on the cap, giving everything a good shake to mix it around. Loosen the cap and leave it on halfway to release the gases and ensure your bottle doesn't explode due to the build-up."

It's important to clean the urine as soon as you spot it ... or step in it. Dogs and cats are likely to mark their territory over and over again if the urine isn't cleaned thoroughly.

6. Keeping the house pee-free

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"In areas where your dog has urinated try to keep him from it or take away the attraction," Dogtime suggests. "For example, if he has urine-marked a house plant, move the plant to another spot he can't get to."

If your cat refuses to use his litter box, the problem could be the litter box. According to Pet Place, a cat might avoid her litter box because of her natural desire for cleanliness.

"If you think the box smells bad, just imagine how it smells to your cat, since she has 200 million odor-sensitive cells in her nose compared to your 5 million," Pet Place says.

In that case, scoop out the box at least once or twice a day. Change the litter often, and scrub the box with warm, soapy water every week.

And if your pet still pees in the house after you've cleaned every pee spot over and over again, you may want to just, you know, move.