3 min read

Baby Otters On The Mend Need One Thing To Thrive

These growing otters need their grub.

Mary and Joseph, a pair of orphaned baby otters rescued after a violent storm in Shrewsbury, U.K., have been on the mend since Christmas in the care of Stapeley Grange Wildlife Centre.

The two have been through a lot together, and they're not just siblings - they're the best of friends.

YouTube/RSPCA Stapeley Grange Centre

YouTube/RSPCA Stapeley Grange Centre

The center's manager, Lee Stewart, told the BBC that, considering their plight, the baby otters are doing quite well. But as the pups get older, Stapeley Grange is facing one rapidly growing problem.

Otters gotta eat. (From matching bowls, obviously.)

YouTube/RSPCA Stapeley Grange Centre

YouTube/RSPCA Stapeley Grange Centre

The pups would ordinarily eat fresh trout caught by their mother - but since she's not around, the center must function as a stand-in parent to ensure their healthy development.

"We want to be sure they are getting the right diet they would have out in the wild, which would give them the best chance of survival when they are released," Stewart told the Royal Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals (RSPCA) news website.

Per month, this will cost the organization about 75 pounds - around 108 U.S. dollars. This means that if Mary and Joseph stay for the nine months the center has projected, the RSPCA will shell out over 4,320 U.S. dollars ... on trout alone.

Fortunately, many people have already come forward with donations - both of money and of trout they've caught themselves.

One thing's for sure: Being a fish connoisseur doesn't come cheap. Good thing M and J are cute enough to have expensive taste.

YouTube/RSPCA Stapeley Grange Centre

YouTube/RSPCA Stapeley Grange Centre

Watch the RSPCA's video of Mary and Joseph below.